Offering

Years ago there was a pastor in Kentucky that sent his parents a microwave oven as a Christmas gift. The gift thrilled his parents, but they found that they couldn’t get it to work even after they had read over the directions. So two days later, as his mother was speaking with a friend, she said that she couldn’t even get that microwave oven to boil water. She confessed, “To get this darn thing to work, I really don’t need better directions; I just needed my son to come along with the gift.”

This situation was like how God dealt with his chosen people of Israel. He gave them the directions in the Law of Moses as the way of life, but they found that they couldn’t live up to the requirements of the Law and achieve their own acceptance with God because of their good deeds. Even the sacrificial worship of the Temple could not ease their consciences. So God gave them a greater opportunity; he sent his Son Jesus Christ. The Son of God was God’s gift of salvation in person, and in him he offered them all his promises of the King who would come in the line of David who would be their Savior, and, indeed, the Savior of the entire world. But still the gift of God’s Son, his appeal to them to accept his mercy through his Son, respected their free choice as human beings. The King came to them to be either accepted or rejected. Jesus publicly entered the city of Jerusalem, on the day that Christians around the world have celebrated as Palm Sunday, as the living fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy, and as a national theophany. Although there was celebration on that day, ultimately it would come out that the nation had missed the opportunity to receive properly their King that God was offering to them.

This still is how God now deals with us now not so much as nations but as individuals who will one day stand before him. One day it will just be y0u standing there before God before the whole universe. Yet long before that time, and sometimes even many times over may present Jesus Christ to us through the gospel as Lord and Savior for our acceptance or rejection. And along with that, there will be ultimate, eternal consequences to our acceptance of Jesus Christ or rejection of him as he comes to us through the gospel.

“When Jesus had already drawn near to the egress down from the Mount of Olives, the whole crowd of disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty deeds that they had seen, as they said, ‘Blessed be the King who is coming in the name of the Lord; peace in heaven and glory in the highest!’”

“And some of the Pharisees who were in the crowd said to him, ‘Teacher, correct your disciples!’”

“And he answered them, ‘I say to you, if these people were silent, the stones would cry out!’”

“And as he came near, as he saw the city he wept over it, as he said, ‘If you have only known on this day what would bring about peace – but now it has been hidden from your eyes. Because the day will come when your enemies will surround you with a barricade, and they will encircle you and completely hem you in, and they will dash you and your children in you to the ground, and they will not leave one stone on another, because you did not know the time that God would visit you!’”

(Luke 19:37-44, Dale’s sight translation)

Jesus Christ is himself God’s gracious offer of salvation. He himself is the gospel, the good news which God has for our world, in person. And God’s offer of his Son to us as Lord and Savior is his final answer, his only offer of salvation. Even more, the open, public offer of Jesus Christ is the open demonstration of the grace of God to our world – his gracious love and mercy to a rejecting, rebellious and dying world, to each individual who is rejecting, rebellious and dying through his or her own sins. Through the person of his Son, then, his public appeal comes for the acceptance or rejection of the salvation which he has provided.

Verses 37-44 describe something that would appear rather modest to a modern witness: “When Jesus had already drawn near to the egress down from the Mount of Olives, the whole crowd of disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty deeds that they had seen, as they said, ‘Blessed be the King who is coming in the name of the Lord; peace in heaven and glory in the highest!’”

This was a procession of a crowd, maybe of several hundred to several thousand people, that went several hundred yards from the Mount of Olives on the usual way down the mountain to the Temple in Jerusalem. Since we usually celebrate Palm Sunday in the morning, we may often see this as having taken place in the morning. The gospel of Mark tells that Jesus went to the Temple just after this, looked around and left, because it was evening. So it may have started around 5 PM local time, and continued until just about 7 PM or so, when sunset would have come.

The crowds, though, recognized the significance of what it meant when Jesus entered Jerusalem on the colt. It wasn’t an occasion just to wave palms and sing songs, because we have done so since our childhood in our churches. There was no tradition of Palm Sunday to fall back on on that day. There was a tradition that explained that act, though. Jerusalem had been the capital of the forefather of Jesus, King David, and this entrance was something that recalled the entrance of the prince, the heir to the throne, who was to be crowned king of Israel. It may have in fact been the same road since in ancient cities which were continually rebuilt the roads were often repaved on top of each other. So this entrance of Jesus was the prelude to a coronation ceremony – as some of our Palm Sunday hymns acknowledge — and his public declaration of his Messiahship by his miracles and his heritage. It represented the offering of Jesus to Jerusalem and to Israel as the heir and successor of David, their promised King. The praise of the people around him, then, was their acknowledgement of his claims to the throne of David. His entrance as God’s promised King, the successor of David, was a part of the demonstration of God’s renewed favor to them.

So now we don’t see Jesus coming personally down the Mount of Olives on a young colt, but a strong reason that churches have celebrated Palm Sunday for centuries is that it reminds us that he continues to approach us through the centuries with the message of salvation through his death and resurrection. The offering of salvation through the gospel of Jesus Christ and the public declaration of the grace of God has now been extended throughout the centuries beyond Jerusalem and the nation of Israel to the entire world. It is still the offer of the promised King, the Prince of peace who brings peace with God when he is accepted. It is the open offer of peace with God through the Son of God, which comes to those who receive him as their Lord and Savior. It is an offer which still called for the response of those who receive it.

Nevertheless, there will be some who will not tolerate God’s offer of salvation through his Son, for whatever reasons that they may have. And the truth is that the free offer of the grace of God through Jesus Christ is often a threat to many in our world, to those who may be comfortable in the routine of the status quo. There are often spoilers in every crowd, and this is what happened then. This is what happened, as explained in verses 39-40:

“And some of the Pharisees who were in the crowd said to him, ‘Teacher, correct your disciples!’”

“And he answered them, ‘I say to you, if these people were silent, the stones would cry out!’”

There were some Pharisees in the crowd, on that road down the Mount of Olives into the Temple at Jerusalem. They may have been some of the Pharisees who had for years gravitated in and out of the crowds and asked hard, even trapping questions of Jesus, or schemed against him behind his back. They might have themselves been going toward the Temple for their own worship and became absorbed into the crowd. Some may have seen their objection as being grounded in good intentions, to forestall Roman intervention into an illegal demonstration. But it is more likely that it was simply their annoyance at the popular recognition of a claim that they had disputed. There was some grudging acceptance of Jesus as a lay religious teacher, who had nevertheless not been through the rigorous training of an officially recognized rabbi and member of the Sanhedrin. But this was going too far – the crowd was cheering and singing for him as if he were the promised King himself. But Jesus refused to shut down the crowd for them, and he refused to disown the kind of honors that they were giving him. His reply about the the rocks crying out was a proverbial expression that declared that honor would come to him from God no matter what anyone did.

Yet today this is still the reaction of some when Jesus Christ is publicly celebrated and offered as Lord and Savior, of those who do not believe trying to shut it down. It may even come from those who are religious, who themselves may be nominal Christians, and many of those from other religions who are willing to accept Jesus as a religious teacher, but try to shut it down when he is publicly celebrated as Lord and Savior, the salvation of God to this world. Yet even in this, God will still reach out to them with the offers of grace and save some, but others will still continue in underground opposition for a long time afterwards. Ultimately, though, no antagonism of any human being to reaching others with the gospel will bring silence to the honor due to the Son of God.

God desires for the people of this world to receive the salvation that he offers through his Son, and so he gives them the opportunity to respond to his grace. Those who are close to God will seek to be a part of this mission as much as possible; those who understand and empathize with God, who are filled with his Spirit and walking in his Spirit will then also seek that others will respond to God’s offer of salvation through his Son Jesus Christ.

God’s grace, then, calls for acceptance or rejection; acceptance brings salvation, but rejection has its consequence also. The rejection of the grace of God leaves only the consequence of God’s judgment. God in his love and patience gives this world the offer of his salvation through Jesus Christ. If that offer is rejected, though, that leaves only his wrath. The rejection of the grace of God brings his sorrow, regret and mourning. Yet God respects the choice of people to reject the terms on which he offers his salvation. To allow them to choose salvation on their own terms would mean that he abdicates his authority and sovereignty as God, but for him to allow people the choice to refuse his salvation is in accord with his creation of men and women as free moral beings with free choice.

In verses 41-42, then, we see the reaction of Jesus, God incarnate, to the ultimate rejection of him from Jerusalem and the Jewish nation of that time: “And as he came near, as he saw the city he wept over it, as he said, ‘If you have only known on this day what would bring about peace – but now it has been hidden from your eyes . . .’”

What we should see is that Jesus has come to a point where he can see the city as a whole, and he knows what will ultimately happen. His compassion for Jerusalem and the Jewish nation of that time led to his tears and lamentation of that time. He recognized the real spiritual blindness that so many would have to himself, his ministry and his Messianic credentials. He knew that he was not going to find the kind of reception in Jerusalem that showed spiritual readiness but rather spiritual blindness that would not mean peace with God. Though there were the crowds that were around him, there would be strong, profound and murderous rejection from the civil and religious powers that be of that time by the end of that same week. Yet still he had compassion for them, over their hardened and unrepentant hearts.

The rejection of the grace of God then makes judgment inevitable. The sad reality is that when God’s patience has finally reached its limit, then his justice begins the process of its terrible reckoning. This is what Jesus is talking about in verses 43-44: “’ . . . Because the day will come when your enemies will surround you with a barricade, and they will encircle you and completely hem you in, and they will dash you and your children in you to the ground, and they will not leave one stone on another, because you did not recognize the time that God would visit you!’”

This was the prophecy of Jesus that was fulfilled in A.D. 70. The land of Israel, what the Romans called Galilee and Judea, would revolt from Roman rule, and the Roman governor of Syria, Vespasian, would invade from the north to put down the rebellion. While the rebellion was still being put down, he found himself proclaimed emperor, and left the final conquest of Jerusalem to his son Titus. This conquest is still commemorated in the Arch of Titus which stands in Rome today. The prophecy of Jesus was a graphic description of the destruction of Jerusalem. The Romans would build a stockade around a walled city to cut it off from the outside world, from all outside reinforcements, and through a combination of starvation, calculated terror and well honed siegecraft conquer the city. Those who were left inside, who survived when the Roman troops broke through the walls, were enslaved or crucified, and small children killed. Some cities were razed to prevent any rebuilding and as a warning to any other cities and nations that would rebel. The siege, capture and destruction of an ancient city was a horror to all involved. And here Jesus ascribes it to the coming rejection of him as their Messiah and the Son of God.

Here it’s necessary to give a pause to make it clear on the limits of what Jesus meant. The judgment would come upon that generation, but not upon all Jews for all time. The pogroms that came later in medieval times in Europe in nominally Christian countries have no justification in scripture; the rejection and persecution of any Jew at any time with the vicious and repugnant term of ‘Christ killer’ is a crime of fanaticism and ignorance. Whatever happened then was between God and Israel, and no one who has the name of Christian has any part to play in inflicting any further justice of God for the death of Christ on any Jew at any time. Rather, the prophecy of scripture was that there would be a continued, partial hardening of Israel to the gospel until near the time of the Messiah’s return (Romans 11), and over that time there would still be those who are Jews who would come to recognize Jesus as the Messiah, as has in fact happened in the ages since the destruction of Jerusalem. Our reaction today, then, is to love the Jews, whoever they are and whenever we can, for the sake of God who chose them and Jesus who is from them, himself of the tribe of Judah and the descendant and heir of David. We are to love them with sharing the gospel when we can, and love them as people when we see them and get to know them, and seek for the highest good that we can in this life that we can.

As a matter of fact, then, the significance for this nowadays is for each of us to realize our responsibility before God when the gospel comes to us. The good news of the salvation of Jesus Christ comes to us now, each of us, as an individual who stands before God, with the alternative of acceptance or rejection. Acceptance means salvation, the forgiveness of sins and eternal life. But for each person who rejects it, there is only left the consequence of judgment that one brings upon oneself. The question is often asked on why a loving God would send a person to hell; rather, the question is why a person would choose hell over a loving God and eternity in heaven. The refusal of the grace of God does not put a person into a neutral ground between heaven and hell, but rather on the path to hell because it is the choice of his wrath. It is terrible to consider, but it is only and completely fair. The person who refuses the grace of God in Jesus Christ is choosing to be treated entirely fairly and with complete justice by God for eternity. The rejection of Jesus Christ is the rejection of the only and ultimate expression of the grace of God, and there are no alternatives which he has left us. But in the tears of Jesus over Jerusalem we see the reaction of God to that choice that anyone makes to refuse his grace: the deep regret and mourning of those who are not choosing something second best but something that will be horribly the worst for them for all eternity.

God’s grace through Jesus Christ shows that he would rather show mercy than show wrath, but the penalty of refusing his mercy and grace leave only wrath. His compassion continues for those who have not heard, who have not understood and not yet have accepted his gospel, and that’s why his wrath tarries. This is the time of God’s visitation for this world through Jesus Christ to reach out to all, and to provide the opportunity for the gospel to go to the ends of the earth. Those who are close to Jesus Christ will also share his compassion for those who have not yet received the grace of God in the gospel of Jesus Christ, and that’s why we continue to seek to reach all the earth with the gospel. Thus the believer in Christ who is walking closely with him must also share his concern and his compassion for those who are lost and heading toward judgment. The tears of Jesus for Jerusalem are echoed in the tears of intercession that we shed in prayer for those who are in this lost and dying world, who need to come to faith in Christ, as we pray for the softening of their hearts and the conviction and witness of the Holy Spirit to them. The tears of Jesus for Jerusalem are also echoed in the tears of compassion which may come in those times that we may have the chance to explain the gospel to others and express our concern and love for their eternal destinies – not as tallies on our gospel belt, but as real people, persons who are eternal souls who will one day stand before God.

And yet, those there are terrible consequences to the rejection of the grace of God, no one has to reject them. The possibility of the acceptance of the grace of God continues for each man or woman while he or she is alive. The consequence of the rejection of the grace of God is a strong warning not to refuse the call of his grace when it comes to you. The opportunities of grace need to be accepted when they come through the gospel. The grace of God meant that the rejection of the offer of Jesus as the Messiah to the nation of Israel on Palm Sunday, which happened finally on the evening which he was betrayed, tried, sentenced to death and then crucified on a Roman cross resulted in a deeper and more lasting offer of Jesus in love of himself as the sacrifice for the sins of the world. The offer of Jesus as King, Lord and Savior then made way to his offer of himself on the cross for the sins of the world, as the innocent and willing victim for us, who took the wrath of God for us. The truest reception of Jesus as king, then, comes through those not who wave palms and sing traditional songs of Palm Sunday, but those who come to him in repentance and faith and receive him as Lord and Savior. The gospel of the Son of God who died on the cross and rose from the dead shows the further and deeper good which God brought out of the rejection of the Son of God to be the redemption of the whole world, and through him now he gives his appeal to the people of this world to be reconciled to him.

So then, have you accepted the King? Is he your King? Have you crossed from death to life through faith in him and him alone as your Lord and Savior? Choose life, eternal life, but repentance for your sins, and place your faith in him and him alone for your eternal salvation.

If you yourself have received the King, does his compassion flow through you for those who have not received his salvation and who may be refusing his salvation? Do you desire that others would come to know his salvation? Will you let the tears of Jesus for Jerusalem come through you as his compassion and love, and share the message of his love to those who need it most.

One thought on “Offering

  1. Nearly 2000 years after the preaching and entrance in Jerusalem of the Nazarene Jewish master preacher, the majority of the world still does not want to accept him neither want to recognise what he really has done, putting his own will aside to do the Will of God; Even in Christendom the majority does not want to see that unselfish act of that Nazarene man and want others to believe that no man would ever be cabable to do such thing.

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