“Do you have a Bible that you can read?”

I think that in the United States too many believers may assume that people they meet have a Bible that they can read. Do they? It’s a reasonable question: “Do you have a Bible that you can read?”

As recently as the late 1970s, even unchurched people recognized a Bible as a big book with a black cover that had lots of “thee’s” and “thou’s.” I think that nowadays we cannot even make that assumption when we deal with people. In this day and age, I think that we can’t make the assumption that many of the people that we encounter could recognize a Bible if they saw one, had ever read one or knew where to buy one for themselves.

So here’s where I’m going with this. Be ready to get a Bible into the hands of others. If you encounter someone who shows real spiritual interest, the question becomes extremely relevant: “Do you have a Bible you can read?”

Here’s a good place to start. Your neighborhood Walmart most likely has Bibles available. I’ve seen them there – decent Bibles for $10 and study Bibles for $20. Many people would spend more than that on lunch. Amazon.com has inexpensive Bibles available as well, and you could order a number of Bibles at a time. Some editions include some pretty good guidance on where to find Biblical help and even a gospel message as well.

Look for a readable translation such as the New International Version or the English Standard Version. This isn’t the place for nitpicky discussions about translation preferences, even if you personally prefer the King James Version. Rather, find one that the normal person can read and understand with a basic knowledge of contemporary English.

Some ministries should pretty much always have a number of Bibles on hand to give to others. For instance, jail ministries often can use a supply of Bibles to hand to the incarcerated. Many, many more churches should have a supply of Bibles on hand as well to give out to visitors and anyone who starts to attend who doesn’t have a readable Bible for himself or herself.

If you encounter someone whose heart language isn’t English, it’s also possible to order Bibles in other languages. Many years ago, I worked with a number of people from Haiti. Their spoken language was French Creole, but their reading language, as taught in their schools, was French. A number of them expressed a real reverence for the Bible as well. I was able to hand out to them a number of French Bibles and New Testaments which I ordered from The International Bible Society (now Biblica). It’s possible to order Bibles in Chinese, Hindi and Pnnjabi from Amazon.com as well, for example. So one of the most precious gifts that you can give someone else could be a readable Bible in his or her heart language.

I also think that parents, grandparents and other relatives could well ask this same question to their sons and daughters, stepsons and daughters, nieces, nephews, grandsons and granddaughters: “Do you have a Bible that you can read?” If not, make one a Christmas gift. If you already give a Christmas gift, continue to give the gift that you normally would – but give a readable Bible as well. Your Christmas budget may be a little larger than usual that year, but to give a person you love what should be very precious gift should be worth the extra expense.

The goal in this is not to manipulate or push one’s faith on anyone else, but to give the recipient of the Bible the opportunity to learn what the Bible says for himself or herself. What anyone will do with Jesus and the message of the Bible is ultimately between that person and God, but if you give the person a Bible, that simply enables that person to investigate and make a better informed decision by himself or herself.

Finally, if someone I know professes faith in Christ, I always make it a point to get that person a readable Bible if he or she does not have one already. It’s all well and good for those of us who have been in the faith for years to have our own Bibles and preferred translations, but it’s absolutely crucial for someone new in the faith to have a readable Bible for himself or herself. There’s a well known TV ministry from the 1950s to the 1980s that had some detractors – but I know for a fact that anyone who made a profession of faith from that ministry received at least a New Testament and often a whole Bible at no expense.

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